Ignoring the rules of the marketing trade

by | Feb 25, 2021 | Ethical Marketing | 0 comments

After nearly two decades in the marketing world, there is one thing I know for sure: No matter what the so-called experts would like us to believe, there is no universal “right” way of doing marketing.

Image by Brendan Church via Unsplash.

“Good marketing” isn’t the result of following a fixed set of rules, or copying a “secret success recipe” or blueprint for a particular channel.

You can read all the books, buy all the courses, and follow the exact steps that online millionaire took, and marketing success may still elude you.

There are no magic potions, no perfect time to post on social media, and sorry, but being an early Clubhouse adopter won’t unlock the path to success either.

What is good marketing then?

You’re doing “good marketing” when the actions you take feel right to you, can be sustained for as long as they are needed, and truly connect with your audience in a genuine way.

It has taken me many years to feel comfortable with this belief, and now I work with many business owners who want to unlearn what they’ve been taught about marketing.

Embracing the uncertainty that comes with finding your own path in business isn’t easy, but what makes it easier is finding others who share your beliefs. Community dissolves discomfort and cultivates courage.

The company of others in the ethical marketing space has emboldened me to trust my intuition, ignore the “shoulds” and take action accordingly.

Slowing down with the ethical move

It is in this spirit that our marketing team at the ethical move approaches how we operate in the online space.

We believe in slowing down the sale, in providing breathing room instead of pressure, and in not adding to unnecessary noise.

Even as our capacity grows, we want to focus our efforts on the areas where we can have a real impact. Just because we do things, doesn’t mean we should.

Leaving Twitter

This thinking has led us to the decision to stop using Twitter as a marketing channel for the ethical move.

We want the ethical move to stimulate conversation around ethical marketing, and there are better channels for us to facilitate that than Twitter.

So going forward, we are keeping our account, but will no longer actively post on Twitter. Instead, you can find us on Instagram and Facebook, and sign up for our newsletter.

As marketers, of course we will continue to embrace learning about new platforms and ways to connect with people. But when it comes to application, we will always try to pause and consider our participation in a conscious way.

If you don’t love every social media channel you’re on, consider whether you need it. Ask yourself whether it allows you to expand your mission and meaningfully connect with your people. If it doesn’t, take that as all the permission you need to find ways to connect that work better for you.